Beneath the APIs that developers use to create and use WebRTC connections lie a number of network protocols and connectivity standards. This brief overview covers these standards.
This chapter describes the DOM Event Model. The Event interface itself is described, as well as the interfaces for event registration on nodes in the DOM, and event listeners, and several longer examples that show how the various event interfaces relate to one another.
This chapter discusses JavaScript's basic grammar, variable declarations, data types and literals.
This chapter introduces JavaScript and discusses some of its fundamental concepts.
This chapter introduces how to work with numbers and dates in JavaScript.
This chapter introduces how to work with strings and text in JavaScript.
JavaScript typed arrays are array-like objects and provide a mechanism for accessing raw binary data. As you may already know, Array objects grow and shrink dynamically and can have any JavaScript value. JavaScript engines perform optimizations so that these arrays are fast. However, as web applications become more and more powerful, adding features such as audio and video manipulation, access to raw data using WebSockets, and so forth, it has become clear that there are times when it would be helpful for JavaScript code to be able to quickly and easily manipulate raw binary data in typed arrays.
The actual value of a CSS property is the used value after all approximations have been applied. For example, a user agent may only be able to render borders with a integer pixel value and may be forced to approximate the computed width of the border.
Browsers use the DOCTYPE declaration to choose whether to show the document using a mode that is more compatible  with Web standards or with old browser bugs. Using a correct and modern DOCTYPE declaration at the start of your HTML will improve browser standards compliance.
The computed value of a CSS property is computed from the specified value by:
One of the most common style changes made to lists is a change in the indentation distance—that is, how far the list items are pushed over to the right. This often leads to frustration, because what works in one browser often doesn't have the same effect in another. For example, if you declare that lists have no left margin, they move over in Internet Explorer, but sit stubbornly in place in Gecko-based browsers.This article will help you understand the problems that can occur and how to avoid them.
The summary of every CSS property definition says whether that property is inherited by default ("Inherited: Yes") or not inherited by default ("Inherited: no"). This controls what happens when no value is specified for a property on an element.
The initial value given in the summary of the definition of each CSS property has different meaning for inherited and non-inherited properties.
Shorthand properties are CSS properties that let you set the values of several other CSS properties simultaneously. Using a shorthand property, a Web developer can write more concise and often more readable style sheets, saving time and energy.
The used value of any CSS property is the final value of that property after all calculations have been performed. For some properties, used values can be retrieved by calling window.getComputedStyle. Dimensions (e.g., width, line-height) are all in pixels, shorthand properties (e.g., background) are consistent with their component properties (e.g., background-colordisplay) and consistent with position and float, and every CSS property has a value.
This section provides a brief conceptual introduction to the DOM: what it is, how it provides structure for HTML and XML documents, how you can access it, and how this API presents the reference information and examples.
This article is an overview of some powerful, fundamental DOM level 1 methods and how to use them from JavaScript. You will learn how to create, access and control, and remove HTML elements dynamically. The DOM methods presented here are not specific to HTML; they also apply to XML. The demonstrations provided here will work fine in any modern browser, including all versions of Firefox and IE 5+.
The PerformanceFrameTiming interface provides frame timing data about the browser's event loop. A frame represents the amount of work a browser does in one event loop iteration such as processing DOM events, resizing, scrolling, rendering, CSS animations, etc. A frame rate of 60 fps (frames per second) for a 60 Hz refresh rate is a common target for a good responsive user experience. This means the browser should process a frame in about 16.7 ms.
The PerformanceFrameTiming interface provides frame timing data about the browser's event loop. A frame represents the amount of work a browser does in one event loop iteration such as processing DOM events, resizing, scrolling, rendering, CSS animations, etc. A frame rate of 60 fps (frames per second) for a 60 Hz refresh rate is a common target for a good responsive user experience. This means the browser should process a frame in about 16.7ms.
The geolocation API allows the user to provide their location to web applications if they so desire. For privacy reasons, the user is asked for permission to report location information.