<a>
The HTML Anchor Element (<a>) defines a hyperlink to a location on the same page or any other page on the Web. It can also be used (in an obsolete way) to create an anchor point—a destination for hyperlinks within the content of a page, so that links aren't limited to connecting simply to the top of a page.
The HTML <abbr> element (or HTML Abbreviation Element) represents an abbreviation and optionally provides a full description for it. If present, the title attribute must contain this full description and nothing else.
The HTML <bdi> Element (or Bi-Directional Isolation Element) isolates a span of text that might be formatted in a different direction from other text outside it.
The HTML <bdo> Element (or HTML bidirectional override element) is used to override the current directionality of text. It causes the directionality of the characters to be ignored in favor of the specified directionality.
The HTML element line break <br> produces a line break in text (carriage-return). It is useful for writing a poem or an address, where the division of lines is significant.
The HTML Citation Element (<cite>) represents a reference to a creative work. It must include the title of a work or a URL reference, which may be in an abbreviated form according to the conventions used for the addition of citation metadata.
The HTML Code Element (<code>) represents a fragment of computer code. By default, it is displayed in the browser's default monospace font.
The HTML <data> Element links a given content with a machine-readable translation. If the content is time- or date-related, the <time> must be used.
The HTML Definition Element (<dfn>) represents the defining instance of a term.
The HTML element emphasis  <em> marks text that has stress emphasis. The <em> element can be nested, with each level of nesting indicating a greater degree of emphasis.
The HTML Keyboard Input Element (<kbd>) represents user input and produces an inline element displayed in the browser's default monospace font.
The HTML Mark Element (<mark>) represents highlighted text, i.e., a run of text marked for reference purpose, due to its relevance in a particular context. For example it can be used in a page showing search results to highlight every instance of the searched-for word.
<q>
The HTML Quote Element (<q>) indicates that the enclosed text is a short inline quotation. This element is intended for short quotations that don't require paragraph breaks; for long quotations use <blockquote> element.
The HTML <rp> element is used to provide fall-back parenthesis for browsers non-supporting ruby annotations. Ruby annotations are for showing pronunciation of East Asian characters, like using Japanese furigana or Taiwainese bopomofo characters. The <rp> element is used in the case of lack of <ruby> element support its content has what should be displayed in order to indicate the presence of a ruby annotation, usually parentheses.
The HTML <rt> Element embraces pronunciation of characters presented in a ruby annotations, which are used to describe the pronunciation of East Asian characters. This element is always used inside a <ruby> element.
The HTML <rtc> Element embraces semantic annotations of characters presented in a ruby of <rb> elements used inside of <ruby> element. <rb> elements can have both pronunciation (<rt>) and semantic (<rtc>) annotations.
The HTML <ruby> Element represents a ruby annotation. Ruby annotations are for showing pronunciation of East Asian characters.
The HTML <samp> element is an element intended to identify sample output from a computer program. It is usually displayed in the browser's default monotype font (such as Lucida Console).
The HTML Subscript Element (<sub>) defines a span of text that should be displayed, for typographic reasons, lower, and often smaller, than the main span of text.
The HTML Superscript Element (<sup>) defines a span of text that should be displayed, for typographic reasons, higher, and often smaller, than the main span of text.