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Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) is an adaptive streaming protocol. This means that it allows for a video stream to switch between bit rates on the basis of network performance, in order to keep a video playing.
The HTML <aside> element represents a section of the page with content connected tangentially to the rest, which could be considered separate from that content. These sections are often represented as sidebars or inserts. They often contain the definitions on the sidebars, such as definitions from the glossary; there may also be other types of information, such as related advertisements; the biography of the author; web applications; profile information or related links on the blog.
The HTML <meter> Element represents either a scalar value within a known range or a fractional value.
The HTML <progress> Element is used to view the completion progress of a task. While the specifics of how it's displayed is left up to the browser developer, it's typically displayed as a progress bar. Javascript can be used to manipulate the value of progress bar.
The command element represents a command which the user can invoke.
The HTML <footer> element represents a footer for its nearest sectioning content or sectioning root element. A footer typically contains information about the author of the section, copyright data or links to related documents.
The HTML <header> element represents a group of introductory or navigational aids. It may contain some heading elements but also other elements like a logo, wrapped section's header, a search form, and so on.
HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) elements are usually "inline" elements or "block-level" elements. An inline element occupies only the space bounded by the tags that define the inline element. The following example demonstrates the inline element's influence:
Before we can start drawing, we need to talk about the canvas grid or coordinate space. Our HTML skeleton from the previous page had a canvas element 150 pixels wide and 150 pixels high. To the right, you see this canvas with the default grid overlayed. Normally 1 unit in the grid corresponds to 1 pixel on the canvas. The origin of this grid is positioned in the top left corner at coordinate (0,0). All elements are placed relative to this origin. So the position of the top left corner of the blue square becomes x pixels from the left and y pixels from the top, at coordinate (x,y). Later in this tutorial we'll see how we can translate the origin to a different position, rotate the grid and even scale it, but for now we'll stick to the default.
The HTML <canvas> Element can be used to draw graphics via scripting (usually JavaScript). For example, it can be used to draw graphs, make photo compositions or even perform animations. You may (and should) provide alternate content inside the <canvas> block. That content will be rendered both on older browsers that don't support canvas and in browsers with JavaScript disabled.
The HTML Datalist Element (<datalist>) contains a set of <option> elements that represent the values available for other controls.
The HTML <div> element (or HTML Document Division Element) is the generic container for flow content, which does not inherently represent anything. It can be used to group elements for styling purposes (using the class or id attributes), or because they share attribute values, such as lang. It should be used only when no other semantic element (such as <article> or <nav>) is appropriate.
The HTML <embed> Element represents an integration point for an external application or interactive content (in other words, a plug-in).
The HTML <hgroup> Element (HTML Headings Group Element) represents the heading of a section. It defines a single title that participates in the outline of the document as the heading of the implicit or explicit section that it belongs to. 
The HTML Mark Element (<mark>) represents highlighted text, i.e., a run of text marked for reference purpose, due to its relevance in a particular context. For example it can be used in a page showing search results to highlight every instance of the searched-for word.
The HTML <menuitem> element represents a command that a user is able to invoke through a popup menu. This includes context menus, as well as menus that might be attached to a menu button.
The HTML <ol> Element (or HTML Ordered List Element) represents an ordered list of items. Typically, ordered-list items are displayed with a preceding numbering, which can be of any form, like numerals, letters or Romans numerals or even simple bullets. This numbered style is not defined in the HTML description of the page, but in its associated CSS, using the list-style-type property.
The HTML <pre> element (or HTML Preformatted Text) represents preformatted text. Text within this element is typically displayed in a non-proportional ("monospace") font exactly as it is laid out in the file. Whitespace inside this element is displayed as typed.