A fundamental requirement of web performance is a precise and consistent definition of time. The DOMHighResTimeStamp type (a double) is used by all performance interfaces to hold such time values. Additionally, there must be a way to create a timestamp for a specific point in time; this is done with the now() method.
The Navigation Timing API provides data that can be used to measure the performance of a website. Unlike other JavaScript-based mechanisms that have been used for the same purpose, this API can provide end-to-end latency data that can be more useful and accurate.
Low-level languages, like C, have low-level memory management primitives like malloc() and free(). On the other hand, JavaScript values are allocated when things (objects, strings, etc.) are created and "automatically" freed when they are not used anymore. The latter process is called garbage collection. This "automatically" is a source of confusion and gives JavaScript (and high-level languages) developers the impression they can decide not to care about memory management. This is a mistake.
The High Resolution Time standard defines a Performance interface that supports client-side latency measurements within applications. The Performance interfaces are considered high resolution because they are accurate to a thousandth of a millisecond (subject to hardware or software constraints). The interfaces support a number of use cases including calculating frame-rates (potentially important in animations) and benchmarking (such as the time to load a resource).
The toJSON() method of the Performance interface is a standard serializer: it returns a JSON representation of the performance object's properties.
The Performance interface represents timing-related performance information for the given page.
The Performance.now() method returns a DOMHighResTimeStamp, measured in milliseconds, accurate to one thousandth of a millisecond.
The PerformanceFrameTiming interface provides frame timing data about the browser's event loop. A frame represents the amount of work a browser does in one event loop iteration such as processing DOM events, resizing, scrolling, rendering, CSS animations, etc. A frame rate of 60 fps (frames per second) for a 60 Hz refresh rate is a common target for a good responsive user experience. This means the browser should process a frame in about 16.7 ms.
The PerformanceFrameTiming interface provides frame timing data about the browser's event loop. A frame represents the amount of work a browser does in one event loop iteration such as processing DOM events, resizing, scrolling, rendering, CSS animations, etc. A frame rate of 60 fps (frames per second) for a 60 Hz refresh rate is a common target for a good responsive user experience. This means the browser should process a frame in about 16.7ms.
The Performance Timeline API defines extensions to the Performance interface to support client-side latency measurements within applications. The extensions provide interfaces to retrieve performance entry metrics based on specific filter criteria. The standard also includes interfaces that allow an application to define performance observer callbacks that are notified when specific performance events are added to the browser's performance timeline.
The Performance Timeline standard defines extensions to the Performance interface to support client-side latency measurements within applications. The standard also includes interfaces that allow an application to be notified when specific performance events occur. Together, these interfaces can be used to help identify an application's performance bottlenecks.
The Resource Timing interfaces enable retrieving and analyzing detailed network timing data regarding the loading of an application's resource(s). An application can use the timing metrics to determine, for example, the length of time it takes to load a specific resource, such as an XMLHttpRequest, <SVG>, image, or script.
The Resource Timing interfaces enable retrieving and analyzing detailed network timing data regarding the loading of an application's resource(s). An application can use the timing metrics to determine, for example, the length of time it takes to fetch a specific resource such as an XMLHttpRequest, <SVG>, image, script, etc.).
The Performance.timing read-only property returns a PerformanceTiming object containing latency-related performance information.
The clearMarks() method removes the named mark from the browser's performance entry buffer. If the method is called with no arguments, all performance entries with an entry type of "mark" will be removed from the performance entry buffer.
The clearMeasures() method removes the named measure from the browser's performance entry buffer. If the method is called with no arguments, all performance entries with an entry type of "measure" will be removed from the performance entry buffer.
The clearResourceTimings() method removes all performance entries with an entryType of "resource" from the browser's performance data buffer and sets the size of the performance data buffer to zero. To set the size of the browser's performance data buffer, use the Performance.setResourceTimingBufferSize() method.
The getEntries() method returns a list of PerformanceEntry objects for a given filter. The list's members (entries) can be created by making performance marks or measures (for example by calling the mark() method) at explicit points in time.