ongotpointercapture is an EventHandler property of the Element interface that returns the event handler (function) for the gotpointercapture event type.
Returns the first element that is a descendant of the element on which it is invoked that matches the specified group of selectors.
Dispatches an Event at the specified EventTarget, invoking the affected EventListeners in the appropriate order. The normal event processing rules (including the capturing and optional bubbling phase) also apply to events dispatched manually with dispatchEvent().
The EventTarget.removeEventListener() method removes the event listener previously registered with EventTarget.addEventListener().
<a>
The HTML Anchor Element (<a>) defines a hyperlink to a location on the same page or any other page on the Web. It can also be used (in an obsolete way) to create an anchor point—a destination for hyperlinks within the content of a page, so that links aren't limited to connecting simply to the top of a page.
The HTML <abbr> element (or HTML Abbreviation Element) represents an abbreviation and optionally provides a full description for it. If present, the title attribute must contain this full description and nothing else.
The HTML Acronym Element (<acronym>) allows authors to clearly indicate a sequence of characters that compose an acronym or abbreviation for a word. This element has been removed in HTML5. Use <abbr> element.
The HTML <bdi> Element (or Bi-Directional Isolation Element) isolates a span of text that might be formatted in a different direction from other text outside it.
The HTML <bdo> Element (or HTML bidirectional override element) is used to override the current directionality of text. It causes the directionality of the characters to be ignored in favor of the specified directionality.
The HTML Background Sound Element (<bgsound>) is an Internet Explorer element associating a background sound with a page.
The HTML element line break <br> produces a line break in text (carriage-return). It is useful for writing a poem or an address, where the division of lines is significant.
The HTML <button> Element represents a clickable button.
The HTML <canvas> Element can be used to draw graphics via scripting (usually JavaScript). For example, it can be used to draw graphs, make photo compositions or even perform animations. You may (and should) provide alternate content inside the <canvas> block. That content will be rendered both on older browsers that don't support canvas and in browsers with JavaScript disabled.
The HTML <caption> Element (or HTML Table Caption Element) represents the title of a table. Though it is always the first descendant of a <table>, its styling, using CSS, may place it elsewhere, relative to the table.
The HTML Citation Element (<cite>) represents a reference to a creative work. It must include the title of a work or a URL reference, which may be in an abbreviated form according to the conventions used for the addition of citation metadata.
The HTML Code Element (<code>) represents a fragment of computer code. By default, it is displayed in the browser's default monospace font.
The HTML Table Column Element (<col>) defines a column within a table and is used for defining common semantics on all common cells. It is generally found within a <colgroup> element.
The HTML Table Column Group Element (<colgroup>) defines a group of columns within a table.